Ultraviolet exposures in different playground settings: a cohort study of measurements performed in a school population.

11 November 2009

Abstract

Background

Solar erythemally effective ultraviolet (UVE) measured on the face, neck, arms, hands and legs of a cohort of school children was investigated with respect to student movement about a school environment located in Southern Queensland.

Methods

A total of 147 erythemally effective solar UV exposures were measured using polysulphone film dosimeters. Measurements were performed on exposed skin surfaces during school hours between 08:30 and 15:05 hours for the period 5 February to 4 June 2008.

Results

Median seasonal UVE exposures varied between 0.4 and 2.7 standard erythema doses (SED) for school students observing the normal school routine between winter and summer, respectively. These exposures increased significantly for school activities scheduled primarily outdoors, reaching a maximum of 50 SED recorded to a vertex site measured during a school swimming carnival.

Conclusion

The excessive erythemal UV exposures measured in this research have the potential to significantly contribute to the later development of melanoma and non melanoma skin cancers caused by acute and chronic cumulative exposure to solar UV in Queensland school environments. The research provides data on personal UV exposures measured in a school population engaged in daily school activities.

Citation

Downs, N.J. and Parisi, A.V., 2009. Ultraviolet exposures in different playground settings: a cohort study of measurements performed in a school population. Photodermatology, photoimmunology & photomedicine, 25(4), pp.196-201.

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