The Design of a Dark Field Backscatter Hyperspectral Microscope for Materials Characterization.

13 August 2018

Abstract

In recent decades, hyperspectral (HS) imaging has become an important molecular characterization tool for cultural heritage. Non-invasive, widefield HS imaging of pigments and binding media on painted surfaces and the identification and monitoring of a variety of other objects, from manuscripts to wood, have been demonstrated[1–3].

When signal is too broad for fingerprinting, often produced from a nonlinear mixed response due to two or more colorants present below the resolution limits of the instrument, HS imaging is usually coupled with complimentary point analysis techniques, such as Raman or FTIR spectroscopy, in order to obtain detailed material information.

However, some challenges are encountered with these analytical techniques, notably the contaminating fluorescence background which can swamp the signal in Raman microspectrometry or the low signal-to-noise ratio in FTIR which can necessitate long integration times prohibitive for imaging.

Citation

Walton, M., Oakley, L., Cooley, V. and Duggins, D., 2018. The Design of a Dark Field Backscatter Hyperspectral Microscope for Materials Characterization. Microscopy and Microanalysis, 24(S1), pp.2140-2141.

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Categories: Material & Chemical, Photonics & Optoelectronics

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