High impact of seasonal temperature changes on acclimation of photoprotection and radiation-induced damage in field grown Arabidopsis thaliana.

8 August 2018

Abstract

At temperate latitudes environmental factors such as irradiance, including ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280–315 nm), temperature and day length vary widely over the course of a year in a concerted way. In the present study physiological acclimation of photoprotection, growth and development of the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana were correlated to these strongly but gradually changing conditions in a one year field study.

Plants were sown in the field avoiding any manipulation (and abrupt change) during their life. Developmental rate was strongly dependent on prevailing temperature. Moderate signs of light stress in form of photoinhibition at photosystem II were significantly related to solar irradiances while amount of DNA damage was low and not correlated to UV-B irradiance.

Although all the markers were hypothesized to primarily react to radiation, multiple regression analysis showed at least a similarly strong influence of temperature as that of light. Especially for the classical UV screening compounds a positive correlation to UV-B radiation during the course of the year was absent, whereas there was a significant negative correlation between temperature and quercetin content.

The sum of violaxanthin cycle pigments was correlated to both, irradiance and temperature, but with opposite sign. Epidermal UV-B transmittance was also much better related to air temperature than to UV-B irradiance. The data show that under natural conditions temperature has at least a similar importance for photoprotective acclimation and partially also for photosensitivity as solar irradiance.

Citation

Pescheck, F. and Bilger, W., 2018. High impact of seasonal temperature changes on acclimation of photoprotection and radiation-induced damage in field grown Arabidopsis thaliana. Plant Physiology and Biochemistry.

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Categories: Photonics & Optoelectronics

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