Furocoumarin‐induced Epidermal Melanogenesis Does Not Protect Against Skin Photocarcinogenesis in Hairless Mice.

11 November 1998

Abstract

Topical 6,4,4′-trimethylangelicin (TMA) plus UVA was used to induce intense epidermal pigmentation in inbred HRA.HRII-c/+/Skh hairless pigmented mice over a 13 day period. Subsequent UVB/UVA exposure was used to assess the photoprotective properties of this tan using skin tumors as an endpoint. Comparisons were always made with sibling albino mice. The TMA/UVA treatment was shown to be not carcinogenic when treated mice were compared with untreated control mice over 25 weeks.

The tan faded despite daily exposure to UVB/UVA and did not afford any protection when TMA/UVA-treated mice with subsequent UVB/UVA were compared with pigmented mice treated with UVB/UVA only. In one group, the TMA-induced tan was maintained by application of TMA three times a week prior to UVB/UVA for the duration of the experiment. This treatment was associated with a significant increase in tumor risk in both pigmented and albino mice compared to groups treated with UVB/UVA alone. Although pigmented mice had a significant photoprotective advantage, it was shown to be outweighed by the carcinogenic risks of the TMA maintenance treatment when they were compared with mice that did not have this treatment.

Nonpretanned pigmented mice developed mild pigmentation during UVB/UVA treatment that was shown to have no protective effect when those mice were compared with albinos. We conclude that induced epidermal tanning with or without furocoumarin enhancement is not an effective way to prevent skin cancer in the HRA.HRII-c/+/Skh mouse model.

Citation

Kipp, C., Lewis, E.J. and Young, A.R., 1998. Furocoumarin‐induced Epidermal Melanogenesis Does Not Protect Against Skin Photocarcinogenesis in Hairless Mice. Photochemistry and photobiology, 67(1), pp.126-132.

Redirect to full article: Click Here

Categories: Photonics & Optoelectronics

Related Components